Best Natural Mosquito Repellent

It’s that time of the Year when the Mosquitos can ruin any camping trip by making your life pure hell! fortunately, there are many great and effective Commercial Mosquito Repellents on the market today. However, if you ever find yourself in a Survival Situation without your Commercial Repellent, what would be the best Natural Mosquito Repellent?

Mosquitos are repelled by the scent of Pine

Mosquitos and other insects are naturally repelled by the scent of pine. Crushing Pine Needles and rubbing the oils released onto you clothes will act as a great Natural Mosquito Repellent. Also burning Pine Needles on your campfire will also help to keep these little pests away. I strongly advise against rubbing Pine oils onto the naked skin … 1. its very sticky and unpleasant stuff and 2. May cause an itchy rash worse than the bites themselves.

Recommended Mosquito Repelling Plants

Many Survivalists recommend crushing and then rubbing the following plant’s leaves and flowers onto any exposed areas of your skin (face, arms, legs etc). You could also consider building your shelter in areas where these plants are growing in abundance (Lavender, for example, can naturally occupy large areas of woodland).

Plants that repel Mosquitos

1. Basil
2. Lemongrass
3. Catnip
4. Mint
5. Marigolds
6. Chives
7. Citronella
8. Lavender
9. Rosemary
10. Ageratum

Whilst all the above do appear to repel the little biters, sadly the effects are limited and you’ll soon find the little bastards are biting you again. I strongly suggest collecting as many of these plants as and when you find them so you can always top up as needed.

Get to know your local plants

On my last few bushcraft trips, I have experimented with many of the local plants to see what provides the best Mosquito repellant qualities. Whilst all the plants listed above do help keep the Mosquitos at bay (though be it only for a short time) I found that nearly all plants crushed and rubbed onto the skin do in some way stop the Mosquitos from landing on you to take a bite. The more aromatic plants/herbs seem to work the best but be careful not to use anything poisonous or that may cause a rash such as Poison Ivy, Poison Oak, Poison Sumac, and the Ragweed family.

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